Article Summary: “Investigating biomedical research literature in the blogosphere: a case study of diabetes and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c).”

Gruzd, Anatoliy, et al. “Investigating biomedical research literature in the blogosphere: a case study of diabetes and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c).” Journal of the Medical Library Association 100.1 (2012): 34-42. Web. 7 June 2014.

 

            Gruzd, Black et al. undertake a study of blogs about diabetes. They want to see if blog writers reference medical literature. Are the blogs that do reference medical articles those that are read often? Which blogs link to each other? To answer these questions, they got three datasets of articles. The first set included articles about diabetes from Medline. The other two datasets were blogs that they got from Google, and 2 other search engines. Basically, what they saw was that there was a group that did reference medical articles, but it seemed like most blogs did not. So people who read blogs might not necessarily be looking for information about a disease from their blog, they may just be looking for support, and to find people in similar situations. Most people who referenced medical articles were doctors. There were blogs that analyzed articles and those that just announced them. Are people getting the information that they need if blogs aren’t very well connected (If there are little blog cliques)? People could be made aware of new medical information easily (They would probably want this information, but would they want it in blog form? And if they don’t want to read about new medical information on blogs, where do they want to get it from?) Since we can figure out the blogs, can comment on them, and we post about new articles on our blogs too (or on Twitter), and break down the articles in easy to understand language. But we should also encourage people to discuss what they read with their doctors, because that’s their turf.

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2 thoughts on “Article Summary: “Investigating biomedical research literature in the blogosphere: a case study of diabetes and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c).””

  1. This isn’t too surprising, since it is difficult to determine the source quality of blogs – I HOPE that doctors are looking for current information from medical publications rather than thoughts on those papers (or thoughts in general, that may or may not be the author’s response to primary sources). I’m realize there are blogs out there that are “verified” to some degree, but I would always question the validity of something that had not been peer reviewed.

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